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Picture the town of Rothesay, New Brunswick. It’s a beautiful little town perched on the banks of the Kennebecasis River. Picture the town. Picture the wide river. Picture all the friendly Canadians milling about. Now scoff at Rothesay. Rothesay is boring. Rothesay is passive aggressive. Rothesay is a town seemingly populated by clones of the Dursley family.

Local visual artist and soon to be Halifax resident Hannah Fleet has been consistently harassed by her town’s government and population because of her car, a 1994 Cadillac hearse.

Fleet’s car is unconventional; it’s the only car that makes sense to find a dead body in the back of. But is it enough to deploy the police and issue multiple ominously worded threats? According to Rothesay it is, but you shouldn’t agree with them. After all, the citizens of Rothesay likely think virgin daiquiri stands line the path to Hell, and it’s reasonable to believe that they refer to parsley as the Devil’s lettuce.


Fleet told the CBC that the city government threatened to tow her car unless she moved it to a less visible area, which happens to be a no parking zone. The police have phoned her at work and visited her home (nothing wasteful about that). And she’s also, reportedly, been given the bird by one of Rothesay’s lovely residents.

What are Fleet’s reasons for buying a car that reminds everyone that they will die one day? Does she hate her neighbors? Maybe she just likes standing outside retirement communities in a loose-fitting cloak, pointing at old people and leaning on her death car. But no, she just thought it was quirky, and that it would be good for her photography career.

What an evil person.

H/T: Julia Wright 

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